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Building an Unbreakable Bond through Running

Running hundreds of miles has created an unbreakable bond between Samantha and her daughter

It’s no secret, running brings people together. They meet at a run club, on the roads, or at the Austin Half Marathon. Whether runners become fast friends or fall in love, it’s obvious running can build an unbreakable bond. Read Samantha’s edition of My Running Story to learn how running helped her and her daughter create their unbreakable bond. They’ve accomplished a lot and Samantha has her eyes set on a major goal on Austin’s streets on February 16, 2020!

Samantha's daughter loves running, it helps build their unbreakable bond.

The contagious smile of Samantha’s daughter when they’re running.

Never thought I would be a runner

I never thought I would be a runner, but my daughter changed all of that. I vividly remember our first run together. Lacing up a beat-up pair of sneakers, getting her little arms and legs inside her snowsuit (spring in Wisconsin), and slogging down the street just trying to sneak in one, maybe two miles. And why did I think that running with a stroller would be easy? Momentum or something? I was so wrong. I was also five months postpartum and had only ever gone for one intentional run before. 

Sure, I ran here and there, but never had I set a mileage or pace goal. That morning in March 2017 was the start of it all. That April we ran our first 5K together and somehow snagged first in our age group. That June we ran our second 5K in our new home: California. Then the miles just kept adding up. We have seen so many miles of California coastline, the Midwest, and New York City strictly by stroller and street. We have completed 5Ks, 10Ks, and a half marathon together. For others, she has waited for me at the finish line.

Her smile is contagious

She has been my biggest cheerleader and coach. Her smile is contagious when she’s taking in the sights on a training run or amidst other runners in the middle of a race or listening to the cheering at the finish line. Running has brought so much joy to both of us. I am forever grateful for my daughter and the unexpected gift she has given to me with running.

Now here I am one month postpartum with our baby boy. We are moving to Austin soon. A new baby, a new home, and a new jogging stroller. There truly is no better way to see a city than by running through its streets. So much adventure, challenge, and joy lie ahead as we get ready to discover the streets of Austin by stroller and street. And what better goal to have than to run the Austin Half (or perhaps I will finally check that full marathon off my bucket list!). Update – Samantha has committed to the Ascension Seton Austin Marathon!

My Running Story is a series of blog submissions from runners just like yourself. They submitted their inspirational running stories as part of a contest to win an entry of their choice to the 2020 Ascension Seton Austin Marathon. Their stories range from crossing their first finish line to drastic lifestyle change due to running. Everyone’s story is different and unique, impacting them in a specific way. While each story is specific to the author, everyone can resonate in some form or fashion because of the power of running. Other My Running Story submissions include Kayleigh Williamson, Kirsten Pasha, and Michael Coffey.

Self-Imposed Challenge Accepted

If he can do that, so can I; self-imposed challenge accepted

Michael ran the 2017 Cap10K after he accepted his self-imposed challenge.

Michael ran the 2017 Cap10K after he accepted his self-imposed challenge.

Michael Coffey was a cyclist. He self-admittedly didn’t consider himself a runner, even though he ran to cross-train. His story of how he became a runner is next on our My Running Story series. Coffey started out like most runners, talking with someone else about running. He believed in himself and next thing you know… self-imposed challenge accepted. Read how Coffey went from a 10K to the start line of the 2018 Austin Marathon

Not really a “runner”

My name is Michael. I never really considered myself a “runner.” I would run some when I was big into cycling, but never ran road races of any kind. This all changed in April 2017. Someone mentioned they were running the Cap10K. I thought, if he can run a 10K, I can run a 10K. BOOM!! Self-imposed challenge accepted. 

I trained for two weeks. Everyone said I would finish around 1:30-1:40. My goal was to just finish injury-free. Race day came and I was nervous. I finished my first 10K in 1:07:30 at 51 years old. I was hooked. The race day environment was exciting and special. 

Self-imposed challenge accepted

Shortly after that race, our son suggested I try a marathon. Sure, why not, I said. Self-imposed challenge accepted. While researching marathons, I found the Austin Marathon in February 2018. I immediately registered. I started training in July 2017, a 32-week beginner training plan. Training went well. In February 2018, I completed my first marathon in 5:26:09 at 52 years old. 

Since that self-imposed challenge in April 2017, I’ve completed multiple 5K & 10K races, one half marathon, three marathons, and the Trivium Hill Country 50K. I have logged about 1,700 training and race miles. I’m now in training for my first 50-mile run in November (Wild Hare) and am again registered for the 2020 Ascension Seton Austin Marathon. Self-imposed challenge accepted. I LOVE TO RUN😎

My Running Story is a series of blog submissions from runners just like yourself. They submitted their inspirational running stories as part of a contest to win an entry of their choice to the 2020 Ascension Seton Austin Marathon. Their stories range from crossing their first finish line to drastic lifestyle change due to running. Everyone’s story is different and unique, impacting them in a specific way. While each story is specific to the author, everyone can resonate in some form or fashion because of the power of running. Submissions will be accepted through August 16, 2020. Other My Running Story submissions include Kayleigh Williamson and Kirsten Pasha.