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Marathon Grows to $48.5 Million in Economic Impact

Austin Marathon’s contributions to Austin’s economy in 2019 experienced major jump 

Runners traveled from all 50 states ad 38 countries to participate in the 2019 Austin Marathon, which contributed $48.5 million to the Austin economy.

Runners traveled from all 50 states and 38 countries to participate in the 2019 Austin Marathon.

High Five Events proudly announces that the 2019 Ascension Seton Austin Marathon presented by Under Armour pumped $48.5 million into the Austin economy during race weekend. The Austin Marathon was able to better calculate its economic impact by providing more detailed data and continuing its partnership with Dr. Ali Dadpay, Associate Professor of Finance at the Gupta College of Business at the University of Dallas. This year’s economic impact on the City of Austin is an $11 million (23 percent) increase from the 2018 event. The growth of Austin’s flagship running event continues to benefit Austin and the Austin economy.

“The Austin Marathon’s economic impact is growing because of the increasing participation rate and more spectators supporting the event,” said Dr. Dadpay. “High Five Events collecting a wider array of quality data has improved the accuracy of our estimations.”

Analyzing the data

For the third year in a row, Dr. Ali Dadpay conducted the research for the Austin Marathon economic impact report. Dr. Dadpay reviewed participants’ survey data, tax revenue, High Five Events’ localized spending, and jobs created. Additional data points were reviewed, including money raised for Austin Gives Miles, participants’ spending, and hotel room nights. This data allowed him to measure direct, indirect and induced effects. Dr. Dadpay expects the Austin Marathon’s economic impact to continue to grow with the increase of out-of-state and overseas participants. 

“The 2019 economic impact report highlights the ever-increasing, annual financial impact the Austin Marathon has on the Austin economy,” said Stacy Keese, co-owner of High Five Events. “The continued growth of Austin’s flagship running event furthers the belief that Austin is a destination for runners from around the world.”

2020 will mark the Austin Marathon’s 29th year running in the capital of Texas. Austin’s flagship running event annually attracts runners from all 50 states and 30+ countries around the world. The start and finish locations are just a few blocks apart and within walking distance of many downtown hotels and restaurants. Participants finish in front of the picturesque Texas State Capitol, making the Austin Marathon the perfect running weekend destination. Registration is still open on the Austin Marathon website.

This One is for You Dad: Running to End Pancreatic Cancer

Tom began running after his father’s pancreatic cancer diagnosis

Tom and his wife, Laura, after running a race for Project Purple, a nonprofit whose mission is to find a cure for pancreatic cancer.

Tom and his wife, Laura, after running a race for Project Purple.

Everyone runs for a reason. Sometimes you run for yourself, sometimes you run for others, sometimes you run for a cause. Like many runners, Tom Hamann does all three. Tom runs to improve his health. He runs to honor his father’s memory. And he runs to end the disease that took his father (TBird), pancreatic cancer. Read Tom’s edition of My Running Story and learn why he lends his legs and his miles to a cause that’s near to his heart. Lend your legs and miles during your Austin Marathon training when you run on behalf of an official Austin Gives Miles charity.

Running to honor his father’s memory

In 2016, my dad – who I always referred to by his nickname “TBird” – was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer. I started running soon after. It helps keep me positive and healthy. Last February, I planned to visit TBird in Austin with my wife Laura and our boys Max and Joe. We live in Michigan. I thought this might be our last visit with my dad. I signed up to run the Austin Marathon 5K during our visit. My boys were registered for the Manzano Mile

Tom's father, TBird, with his two grandsons before he lost his battle with pancreatic cancer.

Tom’s father, TBird, with his two grandsons.

My dad didn’t make it that long. He declined rapidly the weekend before the race. Laura and I flew down right away to be with TBird. We were with him when he died on February 14, 2019. Worst Valentine’s Day ever. I decided to run as many events as I can to help raise money for pancreatic cancer charities. I’m doing this in my dad’s name and to help others suffering from this terrible disease. In May 2019, I did my first half marathon in Chicago, running for Project Purple.

Returning to Austin

My family is coming back to Austin to honor my dad on the first anniversary of his passing – Friday, February 14th. Max and Joe are going to do the Manzano Mile on February 15. I will run the Austin Half Marathon on February 16th. We’re excited for this trip back to Austin; I just wish my dad were still here to join in the fun. 

My Running Story is a series of blog submissions from runners just like yourself. They submitted their inspirational running stories as part of a contest to win an entry of their choice to the 2020 Ascension Seton Austin Marathon. Their stories range from crossing their first finish line to drastic lifestyle change due to running. Everyone’s story is different and unique, impacting them in a specific way. While each story is specific to the author, everyone can resonate in some form or fashion because of the power of running. Other My Running Story submissions include Kayleigh Williamson, Kirsten Pasha, Michael Coffey, and Samantha Santos.

6 Places to Visit Along Miles 6-13 of the Austin Marathon Course

Experience Austin when you visit these 6 locations along miles 6-13

Austin is growing, but that doesn’t mean it’s losing some of its more well-known locations. Whether you’re a bookworm, trying to play a round of golf, or looking for some new shoes, we cover six must-visit locations along miles 6-13 of the Austin Marathon course. If you’re an Austinite, just moved here, or planning to visit during Austin Marathon weekend, put these places along miles 6-13 on your to-visit list!

View from the top floor of the Austin Central Library, located near Miles 6-13 of the Austin Marathon course.

View from the top Austin Central Library’s top floor.

Auditorium Shores

This slice of heaven in downtown Austin is home to the Stevie Ray Vaughan Memorial Statue and the Zero Mile Marker, a common meeting place for runners. You can start here and run an uninterrupted, 10-mile loop around Town Lake. Auditorium Shores (900 W. Riverside Dr.) is home to a leash-free dog park and numerous concerts and festivals. Auditorium Shores will be on your left at Mile 6.

Austin Central Library 

The Austin Central Library (710 W. Cesar Chavez St.) is one of the city’s newest jewels. In addition to its books, it features sweeping views of Town Lake. It’s also home to gallery space, a rooftop garden, downtown Austin’s largest solar installation, and a bar and cafe. In 2018, it was named one of the greatest places in the world by TIME. A Seaholm District staple, you’ll pass this beautiful 6-floor book hotel at Mile 6.5.

Runners test their speed on the Austin High Track, located near Miles 6-13 of the Austin Marathon course.

Runners test their speed on the Austin High Track.

Fleet Feet Austin

They opened their doors in July 2018 and have been so busy you’d swear they haven’t closed them since. Fleet Feet Austin (211 Walter Seaholm Dr.) is a great place to get fitted for the shoes that are perfect for you. They’re also the Official Running Store of High Five Events, supporting athletes of all abilities. Visit Ari and his team and let them know the Austin Marathon sent you!

Austin High Track

Athletes of all levels have completed a speed workout or two at the Austin High track (2100 Stephen F. Austin Dr.). This includes Olympic athletes and runners training for their first marathon. It’s downtown location and proximity to the 10-mile hike-and-bike-trail makes it one of the most-used public tracks in the country. You’ll pass Austin’s fitness hub at Mile 7.5.

View of Deep Eddy Pool, located near Miles 6-13 of the Austin Marathon course.

Deep Eddy Pool is the oldest pool in Texas.

Deep Eddy Pool

This man-made swimming pool is the oldest in Texas and features a bathhouse built during the Depression era. Today, Deep Eddy Pool (401 Deep Eddy Dr.) is popular with swimmers for its lap swimming pool and families for its large wading pool. Clear, cold, non-chlorinated water from two different wells fills the pool. The water temperature varies from 66-75 degrees, making it usable year-round. Runners can find this watering hole near Mile 8.5 of the course.

Lions Municipal Golf Course

This is one of Austin’s most popular courses. Lions Municipal Golf Course (2901 Enfield Rd.) opened in 1924, making it the city’s first public golf course. This 18-hole course is listed on the Registration of National Historical Places by the National Park Service. Miles 8.5-10.5 wrap around the course as it reaches its furthest point west before participants turn easy, heading back downtown.

Miles 6-13 of the Austin Marathon course showcase some of Austin’s oldest and newest locations you need to visit. Whether you’re getting new shoes, checking out a book, or going for a swim, pay these places a visit! Reach out on Facebook or Twitter and let us know your favorite.