Posts

An Athlete’s Perspective – Issue 3

An Athlete’s Perspective is a blog series of event and/or training experiences written firsthand by the athlete themselves. An Athlete’s Perspective is a completely unscripted and raw look into the mind and daily life of an athlete as they prepare for their next race. Readers will discover training regimens, eating tips, gear recommendations, and an uncut perspective into the lives of people like you and me.

Putting Trail Running Into Your Marathon Plans

by: Rio Reina

Reina: 2017 Austin Marathon Elite Athlete

When I first started training for the marathon in 2010, I would have not considered adding a high percentage of mileage on the uneven dirt paths. One reason I stuck to roads for training was to hit my certain paces. Another reason was to avoid the challenging terrain and agility that came with it. But most importantly, at the time, I did not fully appreciate the experience of a traverse through a great trail. I had been used to high rhythm running, where I could turn my brain off and just push through an 18-mile road run. Roads fit the rhythm profile, while trail running was more cumbersome. After moving to the Bay Area in October 2016, trail running has been a big part of my training for the Austin Marathon.  

In the Bay Area running community, trails are king. And how can you blame them? There are single-track trails with epic views that overlook the Golden Gate Bridge within a 15-20 minute drive of San Francisco. Also, there’s a support of races that explore distances of 50K to 100 miles and running stores with trail training groups. After moving out here, I couldn’t help but put in my miles on the trails and start eyeing ultra trail races as well. I do have passion for the roads still and want to achieve a 26.2 personal best in the Austin Marathon, so I decided to do a hybrid road/trail marathon program. I’d like to share some tips with you.   

Here are some of the ways to add trail running into training

Do some long runs on trails, focus on lengthening the duration (total time) and practicing nutrition, forget about mileage

Trails tend to be more technical and challenging than roads, so your pace won’t be the same. This is not a bad thing! This will help more with fat burning and practicing your nutrition plan. If your road long runs are two hours in duration, go for a 2:30 – 3 hour run at an easier effort on the trail. Ensure you have some nutrition and proper hydration. Carry a hand-held or a hydration belt on these runs! I usually low-ball my fuel on these efforts since I’m trying to deplete energy stores, but keep hydration consistent. For 2:30 – 3 hour runs, I’ll take 1-2 gels and 16 -20 ounces of water per hour. 

Use elevation to your advantage

In trail running, elevation is a metric that is often discussed. Trail runners would ask, “How much vert was in the race?”  In fact, the trail runners thrive on a challenging course, while marathoners tend to want a flatter, faster course. With elevation comes the opportunity to work on different running techniques that will help your overall fitness. With long uphills, I tend to find much more stress on my oxygen intake. Long uphills, even at a moderate pace, start to stress the system aerobically like a tempo run.  With the downhill, I practice high turnover and efficient landing. I try to not stomp or brake on downhills, as running downhill is a skill itself, so I try not to disrupt the free energy! My advice is to say yes to hilly trail runs! 

Shredding bark #saytwowords

A photo posted by Christopher DeNucci (@thedenuch) on

Recover on trails

Steve Sisson, coach of Team Rogue, used to tell us, “Hit the Greenbelt!  The muscles get a different workout!” I try to take my recovery runs into trails mainly to give my body a change in surface. I feel like it helps combat overuse injuries by making you change your running mechanics and softening up the impact. Trail running tends to need more agility as well, so the stride is not as linear as road running. While road running takes a toll on quads and calves, trail running tends to use more mobility in the ankles and hips. I would advise recovery runs on trails after hitting a challenging workout on the road.  

Sign up for a trail race!!

I did my first ultra in December at the Woodside Ramble 50K, which was a blast! I enjoyed the race and thought it was a great effort for my first off-road event. The Inside Trail team put on a great event and the trail community is very welcoming. I placed 2nd in 3:42 after running in first for 24 miles; I hit the wall and was passed. I learned a lesson about how trail racing is about patience, fueling, and pacing. The overall benefit from doing this race was that it was a great fitness boost and helped teach my body to burn fat more efficiently. Also, it allowed me to run further than 26.2 miles, which was the first time in my career. To top it all off, the softer trails were much more forgiving than roads, so my legs were recovered within 2-3 days. My advice would be to sign up for a trail race, 30-35K are great and for those looking for a greater distance challenge, look into 50Ks.  They are a fun way to meet new people and break up the monotony of training!

Reina (blue top) on the roads.

Keep the pace and road work in the program

Although I do love a run through the woods, I would advise to still keep some faster runs in the program consistently. I do my tempo runs and half my long runs still on roads to keep my pace dialed down. Road running is still a unique stress on the body and needs to be practiced for a road race. Pick certain pace workouts, like a 12-mile marathon-paced run, to do on a road or bike path course. Also, do a few long runs on the roads as well.

Additional Advice from a National Champ

Lastly, I chatted with Jorge Maravillia, two-time USATF Trail Champion and 2:21 marathoner. Jorge’s advice was that he feels like there’s value that is transferable from trail to road racing. His points were that speed work from road racing tends to help with form while running trails. As for trails, the grit and patience tends to play nicely into marathon training, especially when you are out there for hours. He tends to say road racing is about chasing splits and pushing the pace, while running trails is about enjoying the experience and scenery as you push yourself.  They are different, but he enjoys the challenges in both!

Hydration Basics with nuun

With the Austin Marathon presented by NXP just a few weeks away, it’s a great time to review hydration basics so that you can stay hydrated and finish strong on February 19.

Though hydration is an important factor for your health year-round, regardless of activity, it becomes even more essential as race day nears. Slight dehydration of even just 2% of your body weight can negatively impact your energy, health, and performance.

It’s been shown in studies that this nutritional intervention of staying properly hydrating is the best way to enhance or improve performance.

Signs that you’re dehydrated:

  • Dizziness, confusion, lightheadedness
  • Dry lips, mouth, and skin
  • Physical and/or metal fatigue
  • Decreased pace and/or performance
  • Darkened urine
  • Increased body temperature, heart rate, and/or rate of perceived exertion (an exercise effort that usually feels easy suddenly feels much harder than usual)

Replace electrolytes

Electrolytes are tiny electronically charged particles that are lost via sweat during exercise. The four main electrolytes that play vital roles in hydration and exercise performance are:

  • sodium: maintains fluids balance
  • potassium: prevents muscle cramps
  • magnesium: relaxes muscles
  • calcium: required for normal muscle functions

Electrolytes are essential for basic health and body function, and even more so for performing your best during an athletic endeavor. Electrolyte drinks such as nuun are perfect for pre-, during, or post-exercise as they contain the electrolytes your body needs without the carbohydrates that it doesn’t.

How much should I hydrate?

Maintaining a good hydration status by drinking fluids throughot the day, everyday, is the best approach to staying ahead of dehydration. Waiting until you are thirsty to drink fluids is too late – you are already dehydrated and you’ll find yourself constantly playing the game of catch-up!

On average, you should try to consume half your body weight (in pounds) in liquid ounces plus what you sweat out in training (your sweat rate).  For example, if you weigh 150 pounds, you should aim to consume 75 ounces of water or electrolyte drink per day plus losses that occur during workouts.

To calculate your sweat rate, weigh yourself pre-workout and post workout without any clothes on and complete an hour of exercise without consuming fluids in between. Every pound lost during the workout is 16 ounces of fluid lost. While exercising, aim to replace up to half your sweat rate with electrolyte-rich fluids. This is a great exercise to complete leading up to a race so that you can be prepared to perform your best through proper hydration.

nuun hydration is a proud sponsor of the Austin Marathon. At nuun, we’re on a mission to inspire a healthier, happier, more active lifestyle so that everyone can achieve life’s next personal best. Hydration means more than water, so make your water count. nuun is packed with electrolytes, clean ingredients, and is low in calories & sugar. The light, refreshing taste will keep you reaching for your bottle.

Austin Marathon, 3M Half Marathon Partner with First Texas Honda

High Five Events is thrilled to announce that First Texas Honda will be the Official Lead Vehicle of the 2017 Austin Marathon® presented by NXP and the 3M Half Marathon. As the Official Lead Vehicle, First Texas Honda will provide 2017 Honda Ridgelines for each event.

“First Texas Honda is well-known and respected throughout the Austin metro area for their knowledgeable staff and excellent customer service,” said Jack Murray, co-owner of High Five Events. “We’re glad their team is going to join us on race day and lead these two prestigious events.”

The First Texas Honda trucks will lead the entire race for both the Austin Marathon and the 3M Half Marathon. Their trucks will be the lead vehicles and media trucks for each event. First Texas Honda is well-known in Austin for their hassle-free environment and their excellent customer service.

“First Texas Honda and its family of employees are proud to partner with this year’s running of the Austin Marathon and 3M Half Marathon,” said General Manager Allen Clauss. “We are especially excited to showcase the 2017 North American Truck of the year – the Honda Ridgeline – to the participants and fans of these iconic Austin events.”

The Austin Marathon will celebrate its 26th year running in the capital of Texas on February 19th. Austin’s flagship running event annually attracts runners from all 50 states and 20+ countries around the world. With start and finish locations just a few blocks apart, and within walking distance of many downtown hotels and restaurants, the Austin Marathon is the perfect running weekend destination. Participants can register for the marathon, half marathon, or 5K.

The 3M Half Marathon boasts one of the fastest 13.1-mile courses in the country and will celebrate its 23rd year running on January 22nd. Runners will enjoy a point-to-point course with mostly downhill running that showcases some of Austin’s finest locations. Starting in north Austin and finishing in front of the Texas State Capitol, runners will appreciate a 306’ net elevation drop. Participants can register and book their hotel on the website.

2017 Austin Marathon Announces Balega as the Official Sock

High Five Events is proud to introduce Balega as the Official Sock of the 2017 Austin Marathon® presented by NXP. In addition to being the Official Sock, Balega will sponsor promotions and giveaways leading up to race day and offer discounted product at the Austin Marathon Health & Fitness Expo.

“You can go to any race and hear people talking about their Balega socks,” said Jack Murray, co-owner of High Five Events. “Austin is a well-known running town and we’re glad we can showcase Balega and their technically advanced socks to this running community.”

Balega, a leading performance sock brand in the run and outdoor specialty market, is known for their technical excellence, superior fit and unbelievable comfort. The company provides foot solutions to help runners perform at their personal peak. Balega’s socks are known around the world, but on February 17-18 they can be found at the Austin Convention Center during the Austin Marathon Health & Fitness Expo. Balega’s socks are manufactured at both their state-of-the-art facility in Cape Town, South Africa and in Hickory, North Carolina.

“We are thrilled to be supporting the Austin Marathon this year,” said Tanya Pictor, VP of marketing of Implus Specialty. “We are honored to support such a premier running event and get Balega in front of and on the feet of the active Austin community.”

The Austin Marathon will celebrate its 26th year running in the capital of Texas. Austin’s flagship running event annually attracts runners from all 50 states and 20+ countries around the world. With start and finish locations just a few blocks apart, and within walking distance of many downtown hotels and restaurants, the Austin Marathon is the perfect running weekend destination. Participants can register for the marathon, half marathon, or 5K.