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7 Taper Tips to Follow Leading Up to Austin Marathon

Implement these 7 taper tips leading up to race day

The Taper. For those unfamiliar, tapering is referring to the reduced volume and intensity of workouts in the weeks leading up to race day. While some runners find it hard to scale back after so much time dedicated to training, others find themselves glued to their favorite couch. Doing too little or too much during this time period can compromise all your hard work. Stick to your training plan and focus on what’s in your control. Make sure you are at the top of your game by following these 7 taper tips between now and race day.

Reduce work stress

While it might be out of our hands, setting yourself up with an easy week or two of work can have a big impact on your energy going into race day. If there is a project that needs to be completed, put in the extra effort now to finish it or see if it can be completed after race day. Try building this into your schedule: find a quiet place to meditate for 10-15 minutes in the morning or evening.

No new workouts

We’re clearly stating the obvious, but now is not the best time to roll your ankle playing basketball or pull a muscle lifting heavy weights. Stick to what you know and focus on less-intense and lower-volume workouts. Keep your runs to less than 60 minutes, but leave room for flexibility based on what your body says. It’s fine to do some easy cross-training on non-running days, as long as the activity doesn’t make your muscles sore or increase the potential for injury. If you don’t want to exercise on days you don’t run, that’s okay, too.

  • Example of a one-week-out marathon workout: 15-min warm-up jog / no more than 4-5 miles at half-marathon goal pace / 15-min cool-down jog
  • Example of a one-week-out half marathon workout: 10-min warm-up jog / no more than 2-3 miles at half-marathon goal pace / 10-min cool-down jog

Read a book or binge a show

Has running taken time away from your favorite book or that newly-released TV show on Netflix? Now that you’re logging fewer miles it’s time to play catch-up! If you plan to cross-train it won’t hurt to go for an easy ride on a stationary bike. Read while you pedal. Catch a couple of episodes of that new show. The distraction from that book or the show will also help distract you from taper madness and the fact that you’re running less.

Foam roll

Increase your foam rolling! Make sure your body is in tip-top shape for race day. Work out all those kinks. Keep your muscles feeling good. If you need to, see a massage therapist. As long as you have access to some products, foam rolling can be done practically anywhere. The benefits are immediate. Have some extra time in the morning before leaving for work? Foam roll. Free time at lunch? Foam roll. Catching up on that TV show? Foam roll. You get the idea!

Sleep

This may be the best thing you can do for yourself at this time. Experts recommend sleeping eight to nine hours per night. To start, choose a consistent time that you are in bed, this may or may not include actual sleep. This will signal to your body that rest is important and hopefully lead to more shut-eye. Instead of focusing on trying to get a good night sleep the night before, try for two nights before. Pre-race jitters can sometimes leave us with the “I am not even sure if I slept at all” feeling the night before. Don’t let this bother you. One poor night’s sleep shouldn’t affect your performance if you have tapered well in other aspects.

Nutrition/Hydration

Skip the pizza and beer for now. Focus on a diet that balances moderate carbohydrates from whole food sources, quality protein, and healthy fat. You may also want to keep a close eye on your calorie intake. While you are used to high-intensity training and the extra food that comes with it, you still have to watch what you eat. The pounds you knocked off can sneak back on in these last weeks, which is less than optimal for race day.

Avoid eating that can affect your sleep quality. This includes eating large meals within 90 minutes of going to bed, spicy foods, or large amounts of protein.

Now is also a good time to make sure you are well-hydrated. It is recommended to drink 8-10 glasses of water a day. You can also add electrolytes from nuun, to get your body ready for race day hydration. Hydrate with what will be on course, Mango Orange nuun performance. You can also try the on-course fuel with Gatorade Endurance gels.

Race Morning

By starting now, you are setting yourself up to be ready race morning. The last advice we have is to arrive at least 90 minutes before the start. Walk or jog around as a light warmup. Then follow the Camp Gladiator trainers as they lead a pre-race warm-up at 6:45 a.m. at the start line.

High Five Events, Fleet Feet Austin Join Forces

Fleet Feet Austin will sell Official Austin Marathon Under Armour gear at the expo

High Five Events announces Fleet Feet Austin as their Official Running Store and Merchandise Partner. The partnership will focus on management of all event-related Under Armour gear and expanding community engagement opportunities.

“We’re excited for the opportunity to support and grow Austin’s active community alongside High Five Events,” said Ari Perez, Fleet Feet Austin’s Operating Partner. “Their lineup of premier events, level of community involvement, and record of philanthropy fall in congruence with Fleet Feet’s ongoing efforts in Austin and beyond.”

Fleet Feet Austin will have an increased expo presence at the Ascension Seton Austin Marathon presented by Under Armour and 3M Half Marathon presented by Under Armour. Additionally, they’ll manage the expanded Merchandise Zones that will sell official Under Armour gear. Fleet Feet Austin opened in July of 2018 and made themselves well-known through their positive impact on Austin’s running and fitness community. This partnership includes other events in High Five Events’ portfolio: Manzano Mile presented by Dole, Rookie Triathlon, Jack’s Generic Triathlon, and Kerrville Triathlon Festival.

“The support Fleet Feet Austin has shown Austin’s endurance community directly aligns with High Five Events’ goals and mission,” Jack Murray, co-owner of High Five Events. “By working together we will continue to better the community that we’re a part of and that we serve.”

The Austin Marathon will celebrate its 28th year running in the capital of Texas on February 17th. Austin’s flagship running event annually attracts runners from all 50 states and 30+ countries around the world. Having start and finish locations in the heart of downtown Austin puts participants and spectators near all the action and within walking distance of restaurants, hotels, and shops. Registration is open for all distances.

The 3M Half Marathon boasts one of the fastest 13.1-mile courses in the country. It will celebrate its 25th year running on January 20th. Runners will enjoy a point-to-point course with mostly downhill running that showcases some of Austin’s finest locations. Starting in north Austin and finishing near the Texas State Capitol, runners will appreciate a 300+’ net elevation drop. Registration is currently open.

What the What is it with Massage?

The experts explain 3 different types of massage

Austin Massage Company explains three different types of massage.This post was written by the experts at Austin Massage Company. They’re the official massage company of the 2019 Austin Marathon presented by Under Armour.

So, you’re a runner, but do you know the best type of massage you should be getting? Some of our clients initially think the biggest difference in types of massage is how hard you’re mashed into the table or whether or not cucumbers are placed on your eyes. And before you ask, no these aren’t the types of massage you’ll find on sites like https://www.tubev.sex/?hl=ko. You’ll have to look elsewhere for those.

The varying types you can receive truly impact your road to recovery. We’re here to let you in on a little knowledge about three main types that we suggest for athletes like yourselves:

Active Release Technique

Active Release Technique, commonly known as A.R.T., is a massage technique that combines specific movement with deep pressure to help relieve muscle adhesions and reduce scar tissue buildup. During an A.R.T session, the therapist uses his or her hands to evaluate the texture, tightness, and mobility of the client’s soft tissue. This technique aims to break up these adhesions, as well as work on the movement of the muscle.

Trigger Point

Trigger Point therapy is a massage modality that targets muscle knots and areas of referred pain in the muscle tissue. Therapists search for and target knots in the muscles or areas of referred pain. Deep pressure is used to help loosen the adhesions. Like A.R.T., Trigger Point therapy is best used to treat injuries. Specifically, Trigger Point therapy is effective in the treatment of IT band tightness, calf strains, and hamstring injuries. All of which are commonly found in athletes.

Deep Tissue

And finally, deep tissue. Most runners are familiar with deep tissue. It is often confused with deep pressure (e.g., when you tell the therapist to “go harder”). Deep tissue massage targets both the superficial and deep layers of muscles and fascia. They’re often quite intense as a result of the deliberate, focused work.

Tell them you’re training for the Austin Marathon or Austin Half Marathon!