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Austin Marathon Title Sponsor, Ascension Seton, Returns for Second Year

Ascension Seton’s role as Austin Marathon title sponsor expands positive community impact

High Five Events announces the return of Ascension Seton as the Austin Marathon title sponsor. Entering its second year, the partnership has grown tremendously. Both Ascension Seton and Austin Marathon are focused on helping others improve their lifestyles and helping keep those on the move injury-free. Additionally, Ascension Seton will be the Official Medical Provider. The Ascension Seton Austin Marathon presented by Under Armour will take place on February 16, 2020.

Ascension Seton is excited to return as the title sponsor and Official Medical Provider for the Austin Marathon,” said Adam Bauman, vice president of Orthopedics & Sports Performance at Ascension Seton. “The Austin Marathon reflects the community’s commitment to be an active and vibrant city, and through our partnership with High Five Events and friends of the Austin community, we are committed to promote, support, and facilitate activities for a healthy lifestyle.

Official Medical Provider for race day

As the Official Medical Provider, Ascension Seton doctors and nurses will staff the finish line medical tent and work with Travis County EMS on course. During race weekend, Team Ascension Seton will participate in all events. They will also volunteer their time and have a major presence at the Health and Fitness Expo. Their presence will be felt as they get involved with local running clubs and attend community runs outside of race weekend. Ascension Seton will raise funds and spread awareness as an Official Austin Gives Miles charity. Ascension Seton is part of the largest nonprofit health system in the U.S. and the world’s largest Catholic health system.

“It’s been tremendous to watch this partnership grow and see our continued positive impact on the running community,” said Jack Murray, co-owner of High Five Events. “Ascension Seton’s involvement as Austin Marathon title sponsor has taken our event to another level. We’re pumped to continue supporting Central Texas and the running community together!”

2020 will mark the Austin Marathon’s 29th year running in the capital of Texas. Austin’s flagship running event annually attracts runners from all 50 states and 30+ countries around the world. Having start and finish locations just a few blocks apart, being within walking distance of many downtown hotels and restaurants, and finishing in front of the picturesque Texas State Capitol makes the Austin Marathon the perfect running weekend destination. Registration is currently open.

7 Tips to Help You Run Your Best

These 7 tips will help you run your best and get the most out of training

Run your best when you follow these 7 tips! There are some things that are out of our control, like the weather. But when you execute the things you can control, you truly run your best. These tips are as easy as relaxing while you run and as technical as checking your cadence. Keep these tips in mind when you’re training for the Ascension Seton Austin Marathon.

Runner runs relaxed during the Austin Half Marathon, one of our tips to run your best!

Stay relaxed and keep your body loose during your run.

Relax

Sounds simple, but we can unknowingly put a strain on our body in an effort to produce mileage or a certain pace. Really focus on relaxing your body. Unclench your fists and loosen your shoulders and jaw. You can even begin your run or workout at a slightly slower than normal pace to really dial in your breathing. Slowly increasing your heart rate at the beginning will help with relaxation.

Take time off

Listen to your body, whether you suspect an injury or just don’t feel good. The last thing you want is to have something minor become a major issue. If you have to take more than a day or two off, visit a specialist and get checked out. Ascension Seton’s Dr. Martha Pyron specializes in sports performance. If there’s something wrong she’ll diagnose it and help you build a plan to get back to running. 

Get more sleep

Feeling a little sluggish since you’ve increased your mileage? Add one extra minute of sleep per night for every mile you run that week. If you run 30 miles per week, add 30 minutes of sleep. Your body repairs itself when you sleep. Make sure you give your body enough time to do what it needs when you begin asking more of it.

Runners hydrate with nuun at the Austin Marathon expo. Proper hydration is one of our tips to run your best.

People try different nuun hydration flavors at the 2019 Austin Marathon expo.

Hydrate

This might seem like a no-brainer, but it’s extremely vital. At a minimum, you should drink 30-50 ounces every day. The more active the are, the more you should increase that amount. Make sure you have a good balance of water and an electrolyte-infused fluid, like nuun hydration.

Lift weights

Don’t run every day, mix it up. Cross-training is important to prevent overuse injuries. You work your muscles differently and build strength when you lift weights. When lifting weights, focus on a lighter weight with more reps. If you can’t make it to the gym, build your own workout that includes push ups, sit ups, squats, and lunges. Not a fan of lifting weights? Cross-train with these five non-running activities.

Check your cadence

The average runner’s cadence should be 150 steps per minute. You don’t have to count this in your head! Every runner is different, especially if you’re just starting out of have been running all your life. Under Armour makes knowing your cadence seamless. Their bluetooth connected shoes, like the UA HOVR Velociti 2, sends the information from your run directly to their MapMyFitness app. The app even provides personalized coaching tips! Tracking your cadence, mileage, pace, and other running-related data will help you see improvement.

Focus on your stride

This coincides with the first tip to relax. Your stride improves when you relax. Don’t overstride or run on your tippy toes. You want your stride to be smooth and comfortable. This better optimizes the energy your body uses and helps avoid injury.

You will ask more of your body as you increase your mileage. It’s important that you take care of your body. Incorporate these tips so that you can run your best. Do you have a tip that helps you run your best? Let us know on Facebook or Twitter.

9 Types of Runs Every Runner Should Know About

Know the difference between these 9 types of runs and build them into your training

Whether you’re new to the running scene or have been around awhile, it’s good to know all the different kinds of runs you can work into your training program. This will help you become a better runner and keep you from getting bored while training. Below are 9 types of runs in no particular order that will benefit you during your training for the Austin Marathon or Austin Half Marathon!

Recovery

A relatively short, easy-paced, run performed within 24 hours after a hard session; usually an interval workout or a long run. Easiest training day of the week after rest days. A recovery run is done at an easy pace, “easy” being relative to your fitness level.

Base

A natural pace run to build up aerobic capacity, endurance, and running economy. It is a short-to-moderate-length run and not meant to be challenging, but meant to be done frequently. Base runs will make up the bulk of your weekly training mileage.

Long

This is a run that is longer than any of the other types of runs. Long runs have many benefits: builds muscle/heart strength, improves endurance, and teaches the body to burn fat rather than glycogen as a fuel source. They differ based on your current fitness level and the overall distance that you’re trying to achieve (like 5K or a marathon). Most training plans call for no more than one long run per week.

Hill repeats

Running hill repeats increases leg strength, improves fitness, and uses the muscles of the legs, arms, and core in ways that are different than running on flat surfaces. Hill repeats help improve running economy, which translates into less energy expended over the course of a long-distance race. Start from the bottom of the hill, choose a destination point at the top of the hill and sprint up the hill to get there as fast as you can. Jog back to your starting point and repeat. The distance will be much shorter than your usual run, but the high-intensity sprint, as well as the incline, will make this challenging. Check out these Austin locations and try the recommended workouts from 3M Half Marathon!

Progression

Progression run is a run with a structured pace that increases from beginning to end. The distance and pace will vary based on your specific training goals. This type of run is good for improving your running stamina, mental strength, and teaching the body to run increasingly faster at the end of a race. It’s also a way to get a run in that is more difficult than the base run but not as intense as other different types of running.

Fartlek

Fartlek is Swedish for “speed play.” It is similar to interval training but in a less-structured way and not as intense. It could be a mix of jogging and sprinting, but for beginners, it could be walking with jogging sections added. You can make the distances up on the fly such as – when I get to the light pole, I’ll sprint to the next light pole.

Tempo

Tempo run refers to a “comfortably hard” pace that you can maintain for a longer period of time. It is different than race pace, however. A tempo run (also known as an anaerobic threshold or lactate-threshold run) is a pace about 25 to 30 seconds per mile slower than your current 5K race pace.  Basically, when you run, your muscles build up lactic acid, a metabolic byproduct that causes them to fatigue. The intention of a tempo run is to increase your threshold so that your muscles don’t fatigue as fast. This allows you to keep running longer.

Sprints

Sprint workouts mean to run shorter distances at a faster than normal pace with multiple repeats during the workout. Sprint training is essential if you want to increase your speed. It builds strength and power so that you can run faster. Even if you’re a long distance runner, sprinting is beneficial. Sprints actually help you run longer. They condition your body to be able to handle the distance without fatiguing as quickly.

Interval

Interval training runs are a mixture of low-moderate and high-intensity runs. It incorporates shorter periods of fast, hard runs where you put in more effort, followed by longer periods of jogging or walking. Interval training means that you will alternate between the two. For instance, you’ll run high intensity for one minute, followed by jogging for two minutes, one minute hard, two minutes easy (for a specified amount of time). Pro tip: the intense interval is key and you really need to push yourself to deliver the benefits, which include improving your running efficiency and your ability to maintain higher speeds for longer. It also burns a lot of calories very quickly.

Now that you’ve learned about 9 types of runs to do it’s time to get after it! Don’t feel like you have to train alone. Read about four reasons why you should have a training partner. The more the merrier. Plus, y’all will hold each other accountable and celebrate your training accomplishments along the way to the start line!