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Runner of Austin: Part VII

An update on our special series featuring four Austin runners and their journey as they reflect on the 3M Half Marathon and prepare for the Austin Marathon. Brought to you by CLIF Bar & Company, the Official Sports Nutrition of the 2017 Austin Marathon presented by NXP.

Name – Cressida

Club – Gilbert’s Gazelles

2017 was the third time I ran 3M. It was the second time I ran it just for fun as part of my training for Austin. I’ve only raced in once, and it’s where I got my PR.  This year I incorporated it into my final 20-miler. 2017 was without doubt the most fun I’ve had! I ran with three of my favorite friends from the Gazelles. We didn’t warm up, started in the back, and stopped for bathroom and water breaks. These are things I never do at a race! Even though I wasn’t racing, I did use my Clif shots along the way (mocha is my favorite). Because we went at an easy pace, I was able to appreciate the spectators and great support out there on the course. My favorite part was the turn at Bob Bullock museum when my coach, Gilbert Tuhabonye, cheered us on. Seconds later, my husband and boys were ringing their cowbells!

After the race, we went for brunch with a group of Gazelles and their families, which completed a perfect Sunday! Training overall is going great. Yesterday I did my last hard long run, which included 10 miles at MGP. The conditions were great, so I can only hope that will also be the case on marathon day. Nutrition can be a challenge for me as I work as a clinical psychologist, have two kids, and eat vegan 90 percent of the time (I sneak pizza in occasionally!). I also insist on eating organic and only feeding my children organic food. Unfortunately, many convenient foods that are also kid friendly are not organic. This is why Clif Bar products are a staple in our house. The Coconut Almond Butter Nut Butter Filled bars are my favorite and I eat them after workouts and at work if I need a snack. My kids are huge fans of the kids protein bars and of course the z bars are always a favorite. The Gazelle training has a couple hard workouts left, I know I will be fueled up and ready to give my all!

An Athlete’s Perspective – Issue 3

An Athlete’s Perspective is a blog series of event and/or training experiences written firsthand by the athlete themselves. An Athlete’s Perspective is a completely unscripted and raw look into the mind and daily life of an athlete as they prepare for their next race. Readers will discover training regimens, eating tips, gear recommendations, and an uncut perspective into the lives of people like you and me.

Putting Trail Running Into Your Marathon Plans

by: Rio Reina

Reina: 2017 Austin Marathon Elite Athlete

When I first started training for the marathon in 2010, I would have not considered adding a high percentage of mileage on the uneven dirt paths. One reason I stuck to roads for training was to hit my certain paces. Another reason was to avoid the challenging terrain and agility that came with it. But most importantly, at the time, I did not fully appreciate the experience of a traverse through a great trail. I had been used to high rhythm running, where I could turn my brain off and just push through an 18-mile road run. Roads fit the rhythm profile, while trail running was more cumbersome. After moving to the Bay Area in October 2016, trail running has been a big part of my training for the Austin Marathon.  

In the Bay Area running community, trails are king. And how can you blame them? There are single-track trails with epic views that overlook the Golden Gate Bridge within a 15-20 minute drive of San Francisco. Also, there’s a support of races that explore distances of 50K to 100 miles and running stores with trail training groups. After moving out here, I couldn’t help but put in my miles on the trails and start eyeing ultra trail races as well. I do have passion for the roads still and want to achieve a 26.2 personal best in the Austin Marathon, so I decided to do a hybrid road/trail marathon program. I’d like to share some tips with you.   

Here are some of the ways to add trail running into training

Do some long runs on trails, focus on lengthening the duration (total time) and practicing nutrition, forget about mileage

Trails tend to be more technical and challenging than roads, so your pace won’t be the same. This is not a bad thing! This will help more with fat burning and practicing your nutrition plan. If your road long runs are two hours in duration, go for a 2:30 – 3 hour run at an easier effort on the trail. Ensure you have some nutrition and proper hydration. Carry a hand-held or a hydration belt on these runs! I usually low-ball my fuel on these efforts since I’m trying to deplete energy stores, but keep hydration consistent. For 2:30 – 3 hour runs, I’ll take 1-2 gels and 16 -20 ounces of water per hour. 

Use elevation to your advantage

In trail running, elevation is a metric that is often discussed. Trail runners would ask, “How much vert was in the race?”  In fact, the trail runners thrive on a challenging course, while marathoners tend to want a flatter, faster course. With elevation comes the opportunity to work on different running techniques that will help your overall fitness. With long uphills, I tend to find much more stress on my oxygen intake. Long uphills, even at a moderate pace, start to stress the system aerobically like a tempo run.  With the downhill, I practice high turnover and efficient landing. I try to not stomp or brake on downhills, as running downhill is a skill itself, so I try not to disrupt the free energy! My advice is to say yes to hilly trail runs! 

Shredding bark #saytwowords

A photo posted by Christopher DeNucci (@thedenuch) on

Recover on trails

Steve Sisson, coach of Team Rogue, used to tell us, “Hit the Greenbelt!  The muscles get a different workout!” I try to take my recovery runs into trails mainly to give my body a change in surface. I feel like it helps combat overuse injuries by making you change your running mechanics and softening up the impact. Trail running tends to need more agility as well, so the stride is not as linear as road running. While road running takes a toll on quads and calves, trail running tends to use more mobility in the ankles and hips. I would advise recovery runs on trails after hitting a challenging workout on the road.  

Sign up for a trail race!!

I did my first ultra in December at the Woodside Ramble 50K, which was a blast! I enjoyed the race and thought it was a great effort for my first off-road event. The Inside Trail team put on a great event and the trail community is very welcoming. I placed 2nd in 3:42 after running in first for 24 miles; I hit the wall and was passed. I learned a lesson about how trail racing is about patience, fueling, and pacing. The overall benefit from doing this race was that it was a great fitness boost and helped teach my body to burn fat more efficiently. Also, it allowed me to run further than 26.2 miles, which was the first time in my career. To top it all off, the softer trails were much more forgiving than roads, so my legs were recovered within 2-3 days. My advice would be to sign up for a trail race, 30-35K are great and for those looking for a greater distance challenge, look into 50Ks.  They are a fun way to meet new people and break up the monotony of training!

Reina (blue top) on the roads.

Keep the pace and road work in the program

Although I do love a run through the woods, I would advise to still keep some faster runs in the program consistently. I do my tempo runs and half my long runs still on roads to keep my pace dialed down. Road running is still a unique stress on the body and needs to be practiced for a road race. Pick certain pace workouts, like a 12-mile marathon-paced run, to do on a road or bike path course. Also, do a few long runs on the roads as well.

Additional Advice from a National Champ

Lastly, I chatted with Jorge Maravillia, two-time USATF Trail Champion and 2:21 marathoner. Jorge’s advice was that he feels like there’s value that is transferable from trail to road racing. His points were that speed work from road racing tends to help with form while running trails. As for trails, the grit and patience tends to play nicely into marathon training, especially when you are out there for hours. He tends to say road racing is about chasing splits and pushing the pace, while running trails is about enjoying the experience and scenery as you push yourself.  They are different, but he enjoys the challenges in both!

Runners of Austin: Part VI

An update on our special series featuring four Austin runners and their journey as they reflect on the 3M Half Marathon and prepare for the Austin Marathon. Brought to you by CLIF Bar & Company, the Official Sports Nutrition of the 2017 Austin Marathon presented by NXP.

Name – Jillian

Club – Twenty-Six Two

Training has been going well so far! I have had a recent tendon strain, but with careful planning I have been able to keep up with my training schedule. Running the 3M Half Marathon provided a great perspective on how I need to plan for race day for the Austin Marathon. I used the Clif Strawberry Blok Chews around Mile 9 and they gave me that extra push to finish the race. I have been alternating between using the chews and the gels during my training runs and I feel both give me the energy I need to finish the workout. I like both, so my 20 mile run this weekend will determine which one I use for Austin. I felt I ran a great race and I plan on running the 3M Half again next year with a PR goal!

I have also been eating the Peanut Butter Clif Bars (the chocolate peanut butter are my favorite!) before my weekly runs and they have helped in boosting my pre-run snack with the energy I need to get through my workout. My weekday runs are always in the evening since I work very early in the morning and after a long day of work, they really help!

Austin Marathon Announces Austin Gives Miles Contest Winner

High Five Events, one of the largest privately owned event production companies in the United States, is thrilled to announce that Camp Kesem at the University of Texas at Austin is the winner of the Austin Gives Miles Charity Chaser contest. Chikage Windler, the Austin Gives Miles Charity Chaser will start the Austin Marathon® presented by NXP last and run on behalf of Camp Kesem, earning $1.25 for every marathoner she passes.

“As the winner of the 2017 Austin Gives Miles month-long contest, we are thrilled to have Chikage Windler run the Austin Marathon on our behalf,” said Samantha Finkenstaedt, Camp Kesem Austin Gives Miles Liaison. “We’d like to extend our deepest and most profound thanks to all those who supported us throughout the competition and those who have continued to support us over the past 6 years since our chapter was first founded.”

During the month-long contest, Austin Gives Miles, the Official Charity Program of the Austin Marathon, raised $70,000 ($23K more than 2016), earned 19,705 votes (double from 2016), and received 2417 Facebook and 2511 Instagram likes. To win, Camp Kesem at the University of Texas at Austin raised $6,285, earned 8,299 online votes, and received 509 Facebook and 103 Instagram likes. It is possible to gain Instagram followers organically, but if you find that it is taking longer than you expected, the option to get free instagram followers is always out there.

“I’m proud of the work Camp Kesem put into winning this month-long contest,” said Carly Samuelson, Austin Gives Miles Charity Manager. “They, along with the other 26 charities, raised the bar and truly increased the awareness of what Austin Gives Miles is doing for Central Texas.”

Camp Kesem at University of Texas at Austin was founded in 2011. They support children affected by a parent’s cancer in the Austin community by providing a week-long summer camp experience and year-round peer support. Camp Kesem at University of Texas at Austin is operated by 75 student volunteers and serves 150 campers aged 6-16. They also offer a CIT (Counselor In Training) program in which campers aged 16-17 can apply for and prepare to become a counselor.

The Austin Marathon will celebrate its 26th year running in the capital of Texas. Austin’s flagship running event annually attracts runners from all 50 states and 20+ countries around the world. With start and finish locations just a few blocks apart, and within walking distance of many downtown hotels and restaurants, the Austin Marathon is the perfect running weekend destination. Participants can still register for the marathon, half marathon, or 5K.